Power Lifters: Five Brands That Got A Big Social-Media Lift From Comic-Con

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Power Lifters: Five Brands That Got A Big Social-Media Lift From Comic-Con

comiconSo which films and TV shows got the biggest bump to their social-media accounts during Comic-Con? The Deadline Team already has delivered its verdict on Comic-Con’s big winners (and yawners) overall. And it’s a challenge to be definitive with social media given the dozens of participating properties and connected stars, behind-the-camera notables, superfans and the like.

That said, social-media consulting firm RelishMIX spotted five entertainment properties that hit social-media home runs over the long weekend, led by massively popular Comic-Con videos for Game of ThronesThe Walking Dead and Mad Max: Fury RoadThe Simpsons and Family Guy jointly scored well too, according to RelishMIX’s compilation of who added the most followers/likes/views across YouTubeFacebook and Twitter to their official and related accounts (see chart below).

HBO’s Thrones, already a social-media monster, commanded a truly royal 8.3 million views of its Comic-Con YouTube videos, led by a Season 4 blooper reel that RelishMIX CEO Marc Karzen called a “super video,” with nearly 7.4 million views since it posted just four days ago. 

“Looking at chatter is one thing, but you can see the biggest drivers by far are these super YouTube videos supported by monstrously hungry fan bases,” Karzen said. “Thrones nailed it.”

http://www.deadline.com/2014/07/comic-con-social-media-brands-game-of-thrones-the-walking-dead-mad-max-fury-road-wwe/

Box Office: ‘Lucy’ In The Sky At $44M; ‘Hercules’ At $29M

lucy-scarlett-johansson-posterLucy is not only on track to win the weekend at the box office but is also delivering the most social engagement activity — aboveHercules, the Rob Reiner-directedAnd So it Goes (not surprisingly) as well as The Purge: Anarchy (in its second weekend) and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. Interestingly, a parody video created by YouTube superstar Ryan Higa (who has over 12M subscribers) pulled in 2.37M views as of this morning, according to RelishMix. That parody is also linking to the official trailer so is driving traffic into that.

Lucy stars Scarlett Johansson and Morgan Freeman, the latter of which has 14M fans on FB, so his fans are engaging. That’s a lot of eyes.

Full Story:

http://www.deadline.com/2014/07/box-office-preview-lucy-to-outpower-hercules-and-apes/

Box Office Late Night: ‘The Purge’ Scares In $2.6M, ‘Sex Tape’ Grosses $1.1M, ‘Planes’ Same As Last Year As ‘Apes’ Crosses $100M; ‘Boyhood’ Shows Its Strength

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The Purge: Anarchy is currently the 2nd most socially active pic in July behind Dawn of the Planet of the Apes and its YouTube views (as expected for the horror film) have popped in the last week with the domestic teaser trailer on the Universal channel getting around 7M views and a holdover trailer from last year continuing to grow every day.

Its FB page just past 2M likes and superfans are reposting materials on an average earned/owned ratio of 8  to 1, according to RelishMix. And while this one doesn’t have the social power of last year’s star power of Ethan Hawke, Michael K. Williams “is by far the most social cast member with his 118K Twitter followers,” they say.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/07/box-office-preview-the-purge-sex-tape-and-planes-bow-as-apes-expected-at-no-1/

‘Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes’ Grabs $4.1M In Thursday Late Nights

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Meanwhile, Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes is tracking to making $26M-$28M Friday (including its $4.1M so far from late nights last night starting at 10 PM — see below), so it could make $67M-$72M this weekend. It also has, by far, the most social engagement of any movie right now (as to be expected), but the big story is how Fox has fed over 100 international trailer versions across YouTube produced by language, subtitles, driving views in all regions, RelishMix reports. “Fans are engaging with a storm of behind-the-scenes selfies, groupies, talk show clips and countdown promotions that are being shared primarily on Facebook,” said RelishMix CEO Marc Karzen.

The ApesMovies Facebook page has in fact hit 2M likes after having a nice push of 116K after the global premiere in San Francisco. And who is the social media king on this film? Andy Serkis who plays Caesar. Love the teaser one sheet that featured Caesar, too. Like I said, Fox is doing a wonderful job marketing this picture.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/07/box-office-preview-dawn-of-the-planet-of-the-apes-boyhood/

‘Boyhood’: 39 Shooting Days, A 4,200-Day Production Schedule

boyhood

The film debuts Friday in five L.A. and New York theaters but already has racked up a lot of favorable notice, collaring a Silver Bear for directing and two other prizes at the Berlin International Film Festival, plus four more awards from the South By Southwest andSeattle film festivals. It’s also scored 100 percent among critics on Rotten Tomatoes. Just as important, it’s getting notable social-media attention for an indie release, says Marc Karzen, CEO ofRelishMIX, which tracks online engagement for films and TV shows.

“What’s impressive about this picture is that they decided to drop only a small amount of trailers and spots and make the 12-year experiment the big hook, which fans are sharing,” said Karzen. “It was made before social media existed, but you can see how a good story has an even better chance to find its audience.”

Those few official trailers are getting shared heavily, with an international trailer racking up 3.2 million views, ”very high for an art film,” Karzen said. Fans also have been sharing Coltrane’s interviews about growing up with the movie. It’s doing well otherwise on social media, despite the fact that Linklater, Arquette and Hawke have very small social-media presences. “While (those three) are not social superstars, the buzz is making its way to film lovers, especially on YouTube and Facebook,” Karzen said.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/07/boyhood-39-shooting-days-a-4200-day-production-schedule/

New York Times: Participant Index Seeks to Determine Why One Film Spurs Activism, While Others Falter

nytpartiStories about animal rights and food production, it turned out, were the most likely to provoke individual action. But tales about economic inequality — not so much.

Over all, said Marc Karzen, a social media entrepreneur whose company, RelishMix, advises film and television marketers, Participant will most likely affirm what is becoming clear to conventional film studios: Impact can be less about persuasion than nudging an audience to go where it is already pointed.

“You have to embrace your fans, not shout at them,” Mr. Karzen said. “They need to be inspired to spread the word.”

 FULL STORY:  http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/07/business/media/participant-index-seeks-to-determine-why-one-film-spurs-activism-while-others-falter.html?ribbon-adidx=6&rref=business/media&module=Ribbon&version=context&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Media&pgtype=article

 

 

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The documentary film “The Square,” about the Egyptian uprising in Tahrir Square, Cairo. On an impact scale of 100, the film scored an average of 92. CreditNoujaim Films

LOS ANGELES — You watched the wrenching documentary. You posted your outrage on Twitter. But are you good for more than a few easy keystrokes of hashtag activism?

Participant Media and some powerful partners need to know.

For the last year Participant, an activist entertainment company that delivers movies with a message, has been quietly working with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Knight Foundation and the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism to answer a question vexing those who would use media to change the world.

That is, what actually gets people moving? Do grant-supported media projects incite change, or are they simply an expensive way of preaching to the choir?

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“The Square” scored extremely high for emotional involvement at 97 out of 100, but dropped to 87 in terms of provoking action. CreditNetflix/Noujaim Films

More immediate, those behind the effort say, new measures of social impact will enable sharper focus and rapid course corrections in what have often been guesswork campaigns to convert films into effective motivational weaponry. That approach would apply to a hit like the movie “Lincoln,” which counseled civic engagement, or to a box-office miss like the antifracking film “Promised Land.” Both were Participant-backed films.

To get the answers it wants, Participant is developing a measuring tool that it calls the Participant Index, assisted in the effort by the Annenberg school’s Media Impact Project. In rough parallel to the Nielsen television ratings, the still-evolving index compiles raw audience numbers for issue-driven narrative films, documentaries, television programs and online short videos, along with measures of conventional and social media activity, including Twitter and Facebook presence.

The two measures are then matched with the results of an online survey, about 25 minutes long, that asks as many as 350 viewers of each project an escalating set of questions about their emotional response and level of engagement.

Did it affect you emotionally? Did you share information about it? Did you boycott a product or company? Did it change your life?

“If this existed, we would not be doing it,” said James G. Berk, chief executive of Participant. “We desperately need more and more information, to figure out if what we were doing is actually working.”

The answers result in a score that combines separate emotional and behavioral measures. On a scale of 100, for instance, “The Square,” a documentary about Egyptian political upheaval that was included in Participant’s first echelon of 35 indexed titles this year, scored extremely high for emotional involvement, with a 97, but lower in terms of provoking action, with an 87, for a combined average of 92.

By contrast, “Farmed and Dangerous,” a comic web series about industrial agriculture, hit 99 on the action scale, as respondents said, for instance, that they had bought or shunned a product, and 94 for emotion, for an average of 97. That marked it as having potentially higher impact than “The Square” among those who saw it.

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The documentary “The Cove,” which looks closely at dolphin killing in Japan, had worldwide ticket sales of just $1.2 million after its release in 2009. Yet it has repeatedly led to campaigns to protect the Japanese dolphins. CreditOceanic Preservation Society/Roadside Attractions

Daniel Green, the deputy director for strategic media partnerships at the Gates Foundation, traces the new drive for impact measurement to a Seattle meeting in December 2011 among about two dozen representatives of nonprofits with an interest in social change.

“Grantors didn’t have a lot of sophistication around their analytics,” said Michael Maness of the Knight Journalism and Media Innovation program, a group that attended. He joined Mr. Green last month in describing frustration among nonprofits at their inability to gauge how much change their projects are prompting.

The Seattle gathering led to an association with the Annenberg school’s Norman Lear Center, which early last year established its Media Impact Project. That project, which received $4.2 million in combined financing from the Knight and Gates foundations and from George Soros’s Open Society Foundations, then served as a consultant to Participant in creating its index.

The methodologies being developed by the Media Impact Project will be provided on an open-source basis to those who are interested — whether on the left or right or in the center of the ideological spectrum.

“We’re developing a set of tools and measures that will be available for any researcher, no matter what their viewpoint,” said Martin Kaplan, director of the Lear Center.

Participant, created in 2004 by the eBay co-founder Jeffrey S. Skoll, is using that methodology to build a proprietary database. It will feature three echelons with 35 projects each, or about 100 distinct bits of media, annually.

The company will lean heavily toward films and television shows of its own, especially those carried on its activism-driven online and pay-television network, Pivot. But it will also index properties for partners, like the Gates and Kaiser Family foundations, and for companies or others who will pay a fee.

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Participant was created in 2004 by the eBay co-founder Jeffrey S. Skoll, left, pictured here with James G. Berk, chief executive.CreditEmily Berl for The New York Times

(Prices have not been set, Mr. Berk said, but he expects to serve nonprofits at cost. He declined to say how much Participant has invested in the index.)

In an inaugural general survey, which polled 1,055 of its viewers in March and April of this year, Chad Boettcher, Participant’s executive vice president for social action, and Caty Borum Chattoo, a researcher and communications professor at American University, found some perhaps surprising results.

Even among the presumably progressive Participant audience, crime ranked near the top of the list of 40 primary concerns. It was cited by 73 percent of respondents as an important social issue, placing it just behind human rights, health care and education.

Gay rights, female empowerment and prison sentencing reform, by contrast, ranked near the bottom of the list, while climate change was stuck in the middle, a concern among 59 percent of respondents. Digital intellectual property issues, at 38 percent, brought up the rear.

Stories about animal rights and food production, it turned out, were the most likely to provoke individual action. But tales about economic inequality — not so much.

Over all, said Marc Karzen, a social media entrepreneur whose company, RelishMix, advises film and television marketers, Participant will most likely affirm what is becoming clear to conventional film studios: Impact can be less about persuasion than nudging an audience to go where it is already pointed.

“You have to embrace your fans, not shout at them,” Mr. Karzen said. “They need to be inspired to spread the word.”

One of the weirdest problems in measuring social impact, and one still unresolved, Mr. Boettcher said, is the paradox of “The Cove.”

That documentary, which looks closely at dolphin killing in Japan, had worldwide ticket sales of just $1.2 million after its release in 2009. Yet it has repeatedly led to campaigns to protect the Japanese dolphins, Mr. Boettcher notes, particularly among activists who are aware of the film but will not watch (and hence, would not be counted under the current methodology of the index) because of its gory content.

“They don’t want to see it,” Mr. Boettcher said, “but they will sign up.”

Correction: July 7, 2014
An earlier version of the capsule summary with this article referred incorrectly to Participant Media. It is a privately held entertainment company; it is not a nonprofit company.